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Jail imprisoned

Exhibition
free of charge
Event date
2019-07-04 To 2019-07-23 10:00 To 18:00

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Vytautas Suslavičius Photography Exhibition “Imprisoned in Jazz”

The imprisoned jazz exhibition is based on a series of photographs of the same name, created between 2011 and 2019. Its purpose is to provoke thought by asking, "What does jazz and prison have in common?" Or, "Does jazz, which is based on a musical process, have a thing in common with a photograph that captures a moment of light rather than a passage of time? "

Being not only a photographer but also a physicist, I should first point out that the substitute for the word "jazz" in "jazz" is not logical, because jazz is no place. And if it is not a place, he can neither imprison nor be anything like a prison. On the other hand, if jazz is one of the loosest arts, then why can't it be everything a jazz artist would ever imagine? Why couldn't jazz have the status of a prison, among other things?

After all, passion for jazz or loyalty to jazz in a way imprison a musician, and it doesn't matter that there is no jazz as a place, and jazz itself is synonymous with the freedom of music. Therefore, “Jail in jail” is probably an invitation from a photographer to look back on the nature and freedom of jazz. Look back and ask again: What is jazz?

On the other hand, a photographer captures a jazz artist, in some way imprisoning them, tying them to a moment, to a video, or even silencing the jazz itself. After all, in order to hear music just by looking at a photo, you would probably have to have non-human powers. And the most precious thing for me in this photographic process is that jazz makers let themselves be silenced for at least a moment - devoting themselves to imprisoning photography.

This dedication to a jazz-loving photographer is a huge gift for the project participants, revealing something very important: jazz is not just a musical process, it is also an extremely impressive and difficult-to-catch image that is also an element of the jazz process. The fact that the photographer catches a few images and that the jazz creators get caught is actually a continuation of jazz in another dimension… And I think it's amazing: after all, jazz shows that even when dressed in a prisoner's suit, he is actually so free that transcends the boundaries of music and finds a perfect place in photography - games of light and dark.